January 29, 2021

NATO’s Force Structure and Posture

EPA/SCANPIX
Latvian soldiers (L) with their self-propelled howitzer and U.S. Army Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters during military exercise Silver Arrow 2020 at Adazi military base, Latvia, 02 October 2020.
Latvian soldiers (L) with their self-propelled howitzer and U.S. Army Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters during military exercise Silver Arrow 2020 at Adazi military base, Latvia, 02 October 2020.

The forces and capabilities that will be available for NATO operations in 2030 have, to a great extent, already been decided through the NATO Defence Planning Process. It is now up to individual Allies to deliver on their commitments.

In the third of our series of policy briefs intended to shed light on some of the issues related to the Alliance’s further adaptation, Martin Hurt of the ICDS looks at how NATO’s force structure and posture have evolved since the end of the Cold War, and outlines the challenges of the further modernisation necessary if NATO is to keep pace with an evolving security environment.

Download and read: NATO’s Force Structure and Posture (PDF)


 

In the second policy brief in the series, Una Aleksandra Bērziņa-Čerenkova of the Latvian Institute of International Affairs examines the Allies’ public statements on China to find the common ground that might form the backbone of a NATO Strategy for China.

In the first policy brief in the seriesWojciech Lorenz of the Polish Institute of International Affairs examines how NATO’s mechanisms for consultation among Allies have evolved in response to shifts in the security environment, and offers suggestions as to how these mechanisms might be strengthened as a means of mitigating tensions in NATO today.