November 27, 2008

English Summary

This issue of Diplomacy focuses on the aftermath of the Orange revolution in Ukraine. “Viktor Yushchenko is the new President of a new Ukraine,” sates Grygoriy Nemyria, the director of the Centre for European and International Studies in Kiev. “Ukrainians rein-vented themselves as a nation and Ukrainian society rediscovered it self as a civil society.” He argues that now it’s also time for the European Union to reconsider its strategy towards Ukraine, the possible changes range from basically retaining the status quo to serious strategic changes.

This issue of Diplomacy focuses on the aftermath of the Orange revolution in Ukraine. “Viktor Yushchenko is the new President of a new Ukraine,” sates Grygoriy Nemyria, the director of the Centre for European and International Studies in Kiev. “Ukrainians rein-vented themselves as a nation and Ukrainian society rediscovered it self as a civil society.” He argues that now it’s also time for the European Union to reconsider its strategy towards Ukraine, the possible changes range from basically retaining the status quo to serious strategic changes.

English Summary

This issue of Diplomacy focuses on the aftermath of the Orange revolution in Ukraine. “Viktor Yushchenko is the new President of a new Ukraine,” sates Grygoriy Nemyria, the director of the Centre for European and International Studies in Kiev. “Ukrainians rein-vented themselves as a nation and Ukrainian society rediscovered it self as a civil society.” He argues that now it’s also time for the European Union to reconsider its strategy towards Ukraine, the possible changes range from basically retaining the status quo to serious strategic changes.
Russian political Sergei Markov, who participated in the Ukrainian election campaign as a Kremlin-hired adviser to the candidate Viktor Janukovich, offers a view from Moscow, explain-ing why Viktor Yushchenko didn’t suit the Ukraine’s big Eastern neighbour. Independent political analyst Andrei Piontkovsky holds contrasting views, stating that Russia’s involvement in the Ukrainian elections was strategically misguided and badly executed. He concludes that “Russia will never become an established dominant power in the post-soviet territory, simply because it no one needs it there.”
Michael McFaul from the Stanford University analyses the Western reaction on the events in Ukraine, discussing what kind of outside involvement in the democratization process is legitimate and what should be avoided.
Diplomacy also publishes two analyses of Estonian foreign policy, the authors are Kyllike Sillaste-Elling and Lauri Lepik. On the last page the readers can find the list of articles published in Diplomacy in 2003 and 2004.

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