October 26, 2011

Germany’s vote on Libya: no national interest involved; the use of military means questionable

Following the self-immolation of a Tunisian greengrocer, the Arab world and North Africa went through a public uprising. It resulted, among other things, in Tunisian President Ben Ali fleeing his country and the disposal of the regime in Egypt. Likewise, protests and rebellious forces emerged in Libya, soon with the aim of taking over of the country and overthrowing the Gaddafi regime. After a violent response from the Libyan forces, the United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1970 on 26 February 2011. It demanded an immediate cessation of hostilities, imposed economic sanctions on Libya, established travel restrictions and ordered the freezing of the funds of the persons belonging to the ruling regime.

26.10.2011, Marcel Bouley
Following the self-immolation of a Tunisian greengrocer, the Arab world and North Africa went through a public uprising. It resulted, among other things, in Tunisian President Ben Ali fleeing his country and the disposal of the regime in Egypt. Likewise, protests and rebellious forces emerged in Libya, soon with the aim of taking over of the country and overthrowing the Gaddafi regime. After a violent response from the Libyan forces, the United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1970 on 26 February 2011. It demanded an immediate cessation of hostilities, imposed economic sanctions on Libya, established travel restrictions and ordered the freezing of the funds of the persons belonging to the ruling regime.

Download: Germany’s vote on Libya: no national interest involved; the use of military means questionable (PDF)

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