February 1, 2015

Sweden: Another Weak Link in the Baltic Chain?

Carl Bildt is a eurofundamentalist politician who has attracted quite a bit of attention for his tough talk about Russia in recent years. As foreign minister in Sweden’s recently-defeated center-right government he was “gravely concerned” about this and “seriously concerned “about that, but this new report from Estonia’s International Centre for Defence and Security puts all this concern into some context.

Carl Bildt is a eurofundamentalist politician who has attracted quite a bit of attention for his tough talk about Russia in recent years. As foreign minister in Sweden’s recently-defeated center-right government he was “gravely concerned” about this and “seriously concerned “about that, but this new report from Estonia’s International Centre for Defence and Security puts all this concern into some context.

Last year, Sweden saw a lively debate on security and defence policy issues, focusing on three major topics: Russia’s increasingly unscrupulous behaviour, the poor state of the Swedish armed forces and the future of the country’s traditional non-alignment policy. By the end of 2014, the debate had not resulted in any significant political decisions. It is not obvious why Sweden’s political leadership would need more than nine months to draw the necessary conclusions from Russia’s occupation and illegal annexation of Crimea in early 2014. Neither the previous centre-right Alliance for Sweden nor the newly formed left-wing government were ready to increase the defence budget more than symbolically or consider the option of joining NATO.

The debate was sparked by comments by the Supreme Commander of the Swedish armed forces in 2012 that, once the current defense ‘restructuring’ had been completed, Sweden would have the capacity to defend itself from an attack coming from one direction for (up to) one week.
Read more: National Review Online

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