April 17, 2015

Summary

AFP/Scanpix
Demonstrators dressed as zombies hold a flag of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic while shout mock slogans "We like Russian TV, we like Putin" during a protest outside the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev demanding a law banning Russian television programmes which they consider to be propaganda on March 17, 2015.
Demonstrators dressed as zombies hold a flag of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic while shout mock slogans "We like Russian TV, we like Putin" during a protest outside the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev demanding a law banning Russian television programmes which they consider to be propaganda on March 17, 2015.

This edition of Diplomaatia deals with multiple issues, among them Greece, Russian hybrid warfare and forthcoming elections in neighbouring Finland.

First, Hardo Pajula, the distinguished economics scholar, writes about historical reasons concerning the crisis in Greece. He points out that the roots of the euro crisis lie in the Greek civil war after WW II. He warns that if Greece fails as a state and is excluded from the EU, and possibly from NATO, this could alter the entire security structure of Europe.
William Nemeth, a Colonel in the United States Marine Corps, analyses the Russian concept of hybrid warfare. He explains that in order to understand Russian hybrid warfare one should start by analysing Russian society itself. “Russia can be considered as an epitome of a hybrid state,” Nemeth writes. “The common denominator of various theories on what constitutes a hybrid state is that it is a political regime that has autocratic as well as democratic characteristics. Furthermore, it is not a regime in transition, but rather a type of regime of its own.”
Tarmo Virki, a journalist, gives an overview of the forthcoming elections in Finland. He says it is almost certain that the new Finnish prime minister will be Juha Sipilä, Chairman of the Centre Party, since that party is doing very well in the pre-election opinion polls.
Security expert Richard Weitz writes about the situation on the Black Sea after the occupation and annexation of Crimea by Russia. “Russia’s actions in Ukraine have radically altered the European security equation, with the Black Sea region becoming an acutely contested zone between Russia and NATO,” Weitz writes.
Mare Tropp, the diplomat from the Estonian MFA, is convinced that Sino-Russian partnership might work as long as Russia is governed by Vladimir Putin. The future of Russia does not seem to bother the Kremlin, she writes.
Madli Tikerpuu, a PhD student at the Institute of Political Science and Governance of Tallinn University, is convinced that access to the Indian market is achievable, albeit difficult. She points out that India’s economic growth may create good conditions for foreign investors. However, she warns that the cultural environment is very different from ours and that careful planning and preparation are therefore needed.

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