July 20, 2015

Iran’s Nuclear Deal—Better than the Alternatives

On 14 July, Iran and P5+1 countries (the UN Security Council’s five permanent members and Germany) entered into an extensive contract which marks the end of an important historic period. The contract means Iran is not a pariah country any longer, ends the sanctions established by the UN and sets high monitoring standards to the state’s nuclear facilities. Its supporters applaud the triumph of diplomacy, the opponents are worried that the USA gave up too easily and that the situation in the Middle East will become even more unstable due to the contract. To understand the real influence of the contract on international security, it is worth focusing on the contract itself and leave other Iran-related dangers aside.

On 14 July, Iran and P5+1 countries (the UN Security Council’s five permanent members and Germany) entered into an extensive contract which marks the end of an important historic period. The contract means Iran is not a pariah country any longer, ends the sanctions established by the UN and sets high monitoring standards to the state’s nuclear facilities. Its supporters applaud the triumph of diplomacy, the opponents are worried that the USA gave up too easily and that the situation in the Middle East will become even more unstable due to the contract. To understand the real influence of the contract on international security, it is worth focusing on the contract itself and leave other Iran-related dangers aside.

The contract is a long-expected culmination to a crisis that has lasted for almost 13 years. In 2002, the secret nuclear facilities of Iran were revealed, and, since that, the European Union has made efforts to find a diplomatic solution to the crisis. The two-year-negotiations over the programme of nuclear energy in Iran intensified after Hassan Rouhan became president of Iran in 2013 instead of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The deadline of the negotiations was repeatedly prolonged and the promising comments of the parties on how close they are to making an agreement already became ridiculous in spring. During the last weeks, a lot of shouting had been heard from the negotiation room—both John Kerry, the United States Secretary of State, and Federica Mogherini, High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, had raised their voices. In the end, the efforts culminated with the signing of the contract last week.
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