Estonia

Estonia’s Shiny Event at the UN Exposed Deep Disagreements with Russia

On 8–9 May, the world commemorated the 75th anniversary of the end of the Second World War in Europe. One of the highlights of this occasion was supposed to be a magnificent military parade in Moscow, with a number of world leaders attending to celebrate the Soviet Union’s victory over Nazism. However, the Covid-19 pandemic forced Russia to postpone the parade. It also inspired Estonia to organise an innovative high-level event at the UN that can be considered a success in both organisational and substantive terms.

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Estonia in the UN Security Council: The Importance and Limits of European Cooperation

In January 2020, Estonia became a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) for a two-year term. The international environment, meanwhile, is becoming increasingly challenging for multilateral cooperation and a rules-based global order. The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the lack of global leadership, previously provided by the US, and inability of the UNSC to mobilise international cooperation.

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First Steps towards the Estonian Media Space

ETV+, the Estonian National Broadcast’s TV-channel targeting Estonia’s Russian minority, was launched in 2015 after the occupation and annexation of Crimea as it became evident that letting Estonia’s Russian minority live solely in the Russian media space would pose a security risk.

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The Tartu Peace Treaty and Estonia’s Eastern Border

When Estonia regained independence in August 1991, it was not within the borders in which it was born in February 1920 as a subject of international law under the Tartu Peace Treaty, and in which it was occupied and unlawfully annexed by the Soviet Union in June 1940.

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The Russian Orthodox Church: Faith, Power and Conquest

Until recently, the Russian Orthodox Church was a subject that interested few outside expert circles. That dramatically changed in late 2018 when the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople granted autocephaly (independence) to the Orthodox Church of Ukraine. The reverberations of this decision — religious, political and geopolitcal — underscore the importance that the Church once again plays in Russian policy.

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