July 5, 2013

Freedom or Security: A False Dilemma?

On 3 July 2013, the International Centre for Defence Studies hosted a discussion entitled “Freedom or Security: A False Dilemma?” Moderated by Emmet Tuohy, a Research Fellow at ICDS, the event featured security expert Eerik-Niiles Kross, director general of the Estonian Information Systems Authority Jaan Priisalu, Lauri Almann of BHC Laboratory, and IT expert Peeter Mõtsküla.

On 3 July 2013, the International Centre for Defence Studies hosted a discussion entitled “Freedom or Security: A False Dilemma?” Moderated by Emmet Tuohy, a Research Fellow at ICDS, the event featured security expert Eerik-Niiles Kross, director general of the Estonian Information Systems Authority Jaan Priisalu, Lauri Almann of BHC Laboratory, and IT expert Peeter Mõtsküla.

05.07.2013
On 3 July 2013, the International Centre for Defence Studies hosted a discussion entitled “Freedom or Security: A False Dilemma?” Moderated by Emmet Tuohy, a Research Fellow at ICDS, the event featured security expert Eerik-Niiles Kross, director general of the Estonian Information Systems Authority Jaan Priisalu, Lauri Almann of BHC Laboratory, and IT expert Peeter Mõtsküla.
US electronic surveillance programs – while saving lives by providing information to the law enforcement and intelligence agencies that has helped to avert terrorist incidents – have come under great criticism since programs such as PRISM were revealed by former NSA employee Edward Snowden. While citizens voice greater concern about government access to their email accounts and other online activities, they remain willing to entrust a huge amount of data to private companies such as social networks, search engines, and others. With this in mind, our discussion focused on online transparency, privacy and security. Participants agreed that governments will be able hold accountable only those entities that are located on their sovereign territory and have no control over private companies or other states’ intelligence services. To cope with dangers stemming from covert online activities it was suggested that governments should educate and raise awareness among their populations about the security of their online information. As technology develops rapidly while legislation lags behind we need to evaluate constantly what things should be regulated and on what level of government. Some suggested that the EU and its members should promote the use of encryption techniques in Europe to safeguard private information; others concluded instead that in the end, friendship and trust is outweighed in international relations by states’ national security interests.
The event attracted over fifty participants including representatives of the academic, public, private, and non-governmental organization sectors, members of the Estonian parliament, ambassadors and other embassy representatives, and journalists from Estonian dailies.
Download: Audio

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