December 2, 2008

English Summary

This issue of Diplomacy focuses on the United Nations and its planned reform. American Enterprise Institute’s resident scholar Joshua Muravchik argues that the UN has failed to defend peace and human rights in the world, and its reform will not help. “The world has known a large degree of peace since 1945, which it owes not to the UN but in large measure to American action,” he writes. “A world left to the UN as supreme arbiter would not be the world of law of Kofi Annan’s incantation. It would be the opposite: a world of lawlessness.”

This issue of Diplomacy focuses on the United Nations and its planned reform. American Enterprise Institute’s resident scholar Joshua Muravchik argues that the UN has failed to defend peace and human rights in the world, and its reform will not help. “The world has known a large degree of peace since 1945, which it owes not to the UN but in large measure to American action,” he writes. “A world left to the UN as supreme arbiter would not be the world of law of Kofi Annan’s incantation. It would be the opposite: a world of lawlessness.”

English Summary

This issue of Diplomacy focuses on the United Nations and its planned reform. American Enterprise Institute’s resident scholar Joshua Muravchik argues that the UN has failed to defend peace and human rights in the world, and its reform will not help. “The world has known a large degree of peace since 1945, which it owes not to the UN but in large measure to American action,” he writes. “A world left to the UN as supreme arbiter would not be the world of law of Kofi Annan’s incantation. It would be the opposite: a world of lawlessness.”
European foreign policy academic Robert Cooper holds different views, arguing that what the UN needs is to get the US interested in it. “If the US invested the same amount of energy and intellect it now spends on criticising the UN into getting the UN to work, things would be different,” he states. “But in the current world of foreign policy, there are no institutions that could work against the US and very few that could work without the support of the US.”
In addition, Eerik Marmei discusses the relations between the US and Europe after the re-election of George W. Bush, asking whether we can expect any improvement.
Siim Sikkut and Enn Soosaar offer two different views on whether Turkey should be allowed to join the European Union.

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