December 29, 2008

English Summary

The third issue of the foreign and security policy monthly Diplomaatia focuses on Iraq and defence issues, as seen through the eyes of Estonia and the Nordic countries.

The third issue of the foreign and security policy monthly Diplomaatia focuses on Iraq and defence issues, as seen through the eyes of Estonia and the Nordic countries.

English Summary

The third issue of the foreign and security policy monthly Diplomaatia focuses on Iraq and defence issues, as seen through the eyes of Estonia and the Nordic countries.
The former Defence Minister Sven Mikser discusses the implications of Iraq for Estonia in the December issue of Diplomaatia. Despite the opposition of the general public the state sent Estonian soldiers on a mission to Iraq. Mikser considers this the biggest achievement of the then government. Mikser’s article could also be seen as an attempt to analyse what makes Estonia take sides with the United States.
Diplomaatia asked Ellen Andersen, foreign policy commentator of the Danish daily Politiken, to write an article about the meaning of Iraq for the Danish security policy. “For the first time in history Danish troops were sent off to war without the support of an overwhelming majority of the Parliament. This destroyed with one go the consensus in security policy that the Danish political forces had been maintaining for 15 years,” Andersen describes the new situation.
The first weekend in December sees the results of the Federal Parliament (Duma) elections in Russia. In her article Kadri Liik takes stock of today’s Russia. She concludes that the Russians have grown tired of democracy and explains what this “tiredness” means for Estonia, and thus also, for Europe.
Radio Free Europe Brussels correspondent Ahto Lobjakas has contributed an analysis of the Estonian foreign policy orientation. He notes a tendency in Estonia’s foreign policy to take “an uncompromising approach to problems and divide the world into friends and foes”. Doctor iuris Lauri Mälksoo looks into the nature of the Treaty Establishing A Constitution for Europe.
The Norwegian Defence Minister Kristin Krohn Devold gave an exclusive interview to Diplomaatia. Her main argument is that, given the dangers of today’s world, it is not the size of an army but its mobility that makes it strong. A smaller, mobile army is equally well suited for participating in the NATO Responce Force and for protecting Norway.
In this issue former Prime Minister Mart Laar recommends a book for the Diplomaatia readers. He chose the memoirs of Max Jakobson, the Finnish foreign policy grand old man.

Filed under: Paper issueTagged with:

No comment yet, add your voice below!


Add a Comment